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Harm Reduction

Resources

This resource page is part of an Online Course
Harm Reduction: The Growing Paradigm in Substance Abuse Treatment

 

The Harm Reduction Institute

The Harm Reduction Institute, with offices in New York City, Oakland, and Los Angeles, provides information and training for physicians, nurses, therapists, social workers and case workers. In addition, their website has considerable educational material for both therapists and people suffering with addiction freely available.

From their website:

"The Harm Reduction Coalition is a national advocacy and capacity-building organization that promotes the health and dignity of individuals and communities impacted by drug use. HRC advances policies and programs that help people address the adverse effects of drug use including overdose, HIV, hepatitis C, addiction, and incarceration. We recognize that the structures of social inequality impact the lives and options of affected communities differently, and work to uphold every individual's right to health and well-being, as well as in their competence to protect themselves, their loved ones, and their communities.

"The Harm Reduction Coalition (HRC) was founded in 1993 and incorporated in 1994 by a working group consisting of needle exchange providers, advocates and drug users Today, HRC is a diverse network of community- based organizations, service providers, researchers, policy-makers, academics, and activists challenging the persistent stigma placed on people who use drugs and advocating for sensible policy reform. HRC is a national advocacy and capacity-building organization that promotes the health and dignity of individuals and communities impacted by drug use and the "war on drugs." HRC advances policies and programs that help people address the adverse effects of drug use including overdose, HIV, hepatitis C, addiction, and incarceration. We recognize that the structures of social inequality impact the lives and options of affected communities differently, and work to uphold every individual's right to health and well-being, as well as in their competence to protect themselves, their loved ones, and their communities.

"Since its inception in 1994, HRC advances public policy by prioritizing areas where structural inequalities and social injustice magnify drug-related harm. HRC operates five core programs:

  1. technical assistance, training, and capacity building on expanding syringe access, overdose prevention and education, hepatitis C prevention and treatment, and HIV prevention in communities of color
  2. policy analysis and advocacy on drug user health issues in local, regional, and national arenas
  3. publications, reports, and topical materials
  4. national and regional conferences, community forums, and coalitions and
  5. extensive education/training on harm reduction principles and practice through the Harm Reduction Training Institute

"The core programs integrate a particular focus on the most at-risk communities, such as women drug users, concentrating on environmental factors that contribute women's vulnerability to drug-related harm. Within this context, HRC's core projects have a unique understanding of how structural forces hinder the health and well-being of women drug users and applies this expertise in the Women & Drug Use Network."

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For Therapists

Motivational Interviewing is an extremely useful technique for harm reduction OR abstention therapy, and it is relatively easy to learn because it incorporates many elements of good, basic therapy. Additional information on Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Motivational Interviewing. You will find explanations, a complete library and references, and training materials and schedules.

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Support Groups

Those looking for self-help groups that practice controlled drinking should check Moderation Management. Although there are only about 20 moderation management groups meeting in the United States, the website also provides listings of Internet support groups and listservs, as well as additional resources to help practice controlled drinking.

In addition, there are other organizations for alcoholics that present themselves as an alternative to AA but are oriented toward abstention, not controlled drinking.

Self-Management and Recovery Training offers online and in-person support groups, as well as other resources and materials.

Women for Sobriety runs groups around the country and offers information for women alcoholics only.

Secular Organization for Sobriety is self-described as an organization for those who wish to abstain but are uncomfortable with the higher power orientation of AA, offers material, a newsletter, a list of in-person meetings, and online support groups.

 

Additional References on Harm Reduction

Alan, M. G. M., Larimer, E. , and Witkiewitz, K., (Eds.) (2012). Harm reduction: Pragmatic strategies for managing high-risk behaviors. 2d ed. New York: Guilford.

Blume, A. W. (2012) Seeking the middle way: G. Alan Marlatt and harm reduction. Addiction Research & Theory 20:3, pages 218-226.

Center for Harm Reduction Therapy. (2016). How you can help. Retrieved from http://harmreductiontherapy.org/helping-opportunities/.

Davis, A. K., & Rosenberg, H. (2013). Acceptance of non-abstinence goals by addiction professionals in the United States. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 27(4), 1102–1109.

Davis, D., Hawk, M., Marx, M., & Hunsaker, A. (2014). Mechanisms of adherence in a harm reduction housing program. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 14(2), 155–174.

Des Jarlais, D. C. (2010). Learning from HIV epidemics among injection drug users. Harm reduction: moving through the third decade. International Journal of Drug Policy, 21, 97–99.

Ernest, D., Anderson, K., Haemmig, R. et al. 2016. Treating addictions: Harm reduction in clinical care and prevention. Bioethical Inquiry 13:239–249.

Fagerström, K. and Bridgman, K. (2014). Tobacco harm reduction: The need for new products that can compete with cigarettes. Addictive Behaviors, 39(3), 07-511.

Harm Reduction Coalition (2011). Guide to developing and managing syringe access programs. Retrieved from http://harmreduction.org/issues/syringe-access/tools-best-practices/manuals-and-best-practice-documents/syringe-access-manual/

Henwood, B. F., Padgett, D. K., & Tiderington, E. (2014). Provider views of harm reduction versus abstinence policies within homeless services for dually diagnosed adults. Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research, 41, 80–89.

Inciardi, J. A., ed. )2000). Harm reduction: National and international perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Inciardi J.A, &Harrison L,D. (2000). Introduction: the concept of harm reduction. In: Inciardi JA, Harrison LD, eds. Harm Reduction: National and International Perspective, 2-19. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Karoll, B. R. (2010). Applying social work approaches, harm reduction, and practice wisdom to better serve those alcohol and drug use disorders. Journal of Social Work, 10(3), 263–281.

Larimer, M. E., Marlatt, G. A., Baer, J. S., Quigley, L. A., Blume, A. W., & Hawkins, E. H. (1998). Harm reduction for alcohol problems: Expanding access to and acceptability of prevention and treatment services. In G. A. Marlatt (Ed.), Harm reduction: Pragmatic strategies for managing high-risk behaviors (pp. 69-121). New York: Guilford Press.

Lee, H. S., Engstrom, M., & Petersen, S. R. (2011). Harm reduction and 12 steps: Complementary, oppositional, or something in-between? Substance Use and Misuse, 46(9), 1151–1161

MacCoun, R. J. (1998). Toward a psychology of harm reduction. American Psychologist, 53(11), 1199-1208

Magill, M., Colby, S. M., Orchowski, L., Murphy, J. G., Hoadley, A., Brazil, L. A., & Barnett, N. P. (2017). How does brief motivational intervention change heavy drinking and harm among underage young adult drinkers? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 85(5), 447-458.

Marlatt, G. Alan, Mary E. Larimer, and Katie Witkiewitz, eds. 2012. Harm reduction: Pragmatic strategies for managing high risk behaviors. 2d ed. New York: Guilford.

Marlatt, G. A., & Tapert, S. F. (1993). Harm reduction: Reducing the risks of addictive behaviors. In J. S. Baer, G. A. Marlatt, & R. J. McMahon (Eds.), Addictive behaviors across the life span: Prevention, treatment, and policy issues (pp. 243-273). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Maziak, W. (2014). Harm Reduction at the Crossroads. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47(4), 505-507.

Monti, P. M., Colby, S. M., Barnett, N. P., Spirito, A., Rohsenow, D. J., Myers, M., . . . Lewander, W. (1999). Brief intervention for harm reduction with alcohol-positive older adolescents in a hospital emergency department. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 67(6), 989-994.

Pates, Richard, P. & Riley D. M. , eds. 2012. Harm reduction in substance use and high-risk behaviour: International policy and practice. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Peterson, P. L., Dimeff, L. A., Tapert, S. F., Stern, M., & Gorman, M. (1998). Harm reduction and HIV/AIDS prevention. In G. A. Marlatt (Ed.), Harm reduction: Pragmatic strategies for managing high-risk behaviors (pp. 218-297). New York: Guilford Press.

Rosenberg, H., & Phillips, K. T. (2003). Acceptability and availability of harm-reduction interventions for drug abuse in American substance abuse treatment agencies. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 17(3), 203-210.

Runyan, C. N., Hewitt, A. L., Martin, S. A., & Mullin, D. (2017). Confronting the new epidemic: Integrated care for opioid use disorders. Families, Systems, & Health, 35(2), 248-250.

Stimson, G., & O’Hare, P. (2010). Harm reduction: Moving through the third decade. International Journal of Drug Policy, 21, 91–93.

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